About

Laure Meloy sang her role and festival debut as Brünnhilde in Die Walküre for Grimeborn Opera Festival 2021, which received an Offie award nomination for best opera production. Other recent projects include her debut in Germany as Zaïde with Theater Freiburg in Zaïde/Adama, Chaya Czernowin’s updated realisation of Mozart’s unfinished opera; One Art, a monodrama about the life of Elizabeth Bishop with music by Paula M. Kimper at Tête à Tête Opera Festival, with the companion CD One Art named a winner in the HPR International Art Song Contest; and her debut at Hungarian State Opera, as Ariel in Thomas Adès’ The Tempest.

Mainstream opera roles include Lucia, Fiordiligi, Konstanze, and Marquise de Cathé Un Giorno di Regno. Laure has performed with the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, English National Opera, Welsh National Opera, Opera North, the Florentine Opera of Milwaukee, Aspen Opera Theater, and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s. She joined the roster of the Metropolitan Opera in the 2012-2013 and 2017-2018 seasons.

Ms. Meloy has made a specialty of singing challenging 20th and 21st century repertoire, with roles such as Berg’s Lulu, Madame Mao Nixon in China, Janine/Ofwarren A Handmaid’s Tale, Henze’s Hilda Mack (Elegy for Young lovers) and Ligeti’s Venus/Geppo (Le Grand Macabre.) She was critically acclaimed for Hecuba in English Touring Opera’s Olivier Award winning King Priam (Tippett.) Laure performed in a Tempest themed concert with Thomas Adès for La Poisson Rouge and The Shakespeare Society of New York. She covered Leticia in Adès’ latest opera The Exterminating Angel for the Metropolitan Opera, the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, and the Salzburg Festival (world premiere.) She sang inthe world premiere of Paula M. Kimper’s Patience & Sarah at the Lincoln Center Festival New York, and the role of Kaye in the American premiere of John Metcalf’s Kafka’s Chimp.

Concert repertoire includes Vaughan Williams Sea Symphony, Mozart Mass in C Minor (both at Canterbury Cathedral), Carmina Burana, Gounod St. Cecilia Mass, Rossini Stabat Mater, Rossini Petite Messe Solennelle, Poulenc Gloria (Minnesota Public Radio),Beethoven Mass in C, Vivaldi Magnificat, Haydn Creation (Bronxnet Television), Brahms Requiem, and Rutter Gloria (Minnesota Public Radio). She has presented recitals in Minneapolis, Broadstairs, at the Canterbury Festival and in London. Her voice was featured in the BBC/Sony Pictures film Rocketmen, and she has released two CDs of opera arias and duets.

Born in the United States, Ms. Meloy studied at Central Michigan University (B Mus, cum laude), the University of Minnesota (M Mus), and Manhattan School of Music. She was a Young Artist/Apprentice at the Aspen Opera Theater, the Florentine Opera of Milwaukee, and Sarasota Opera. She lives in the UK, and holds dual US and UK citizenship.


‘Laure Meloy’s feisty Brünnhilde was just as superb, her “hojotohos” ringing out rebelliously. But it was that relationship with Stone’s Wotan which was at the heart of this staging, questioning his decision-making, daring to challenge him.’ Mark Pullinger, BachTrack

‘A privilege to hear singing of this quality outside the big houses with their big prices – Mark Stone expressive as Wotan, Laure Meloy heartbreaking as Brünnhilde and soprano, Natasha Jouhl, sensational as Sieglinde.’ Gary Naylor, Broadway World

‘I certainly think we will be seeing more of her in the role. The tessitura challenges of the role in this opera (top C’s for the opening and then lots in the mezzo-soprano register) seemed to hold no horrors for her, and throughout this was a beautifully sung account of the role, poised and with bright, forward tone. She gave Brünnhilde a sense of dramatic journey as her unquestioning obedience to her father changed … Her final scene with her father was anxious, intense and thoroughly believable.’ Planet Hugill

‘Meloy’s Brünnhilde is impressively secure and the final scene for her and Wotan is deeply moving.’ Barry Millington, London Evening Standard

‘Meloy brings wonderfully rich singing to her moving portrayal of Brünnhilde.’ London Living Large

‘[Meloy] sings with great honesty and clarity, her tone consistently firm and appealing.’ The Stage

‘Meloy sings the enchanting Zaide Aria “Ruhe sanft mein holdes Leben” smoothly to the top, with a substance that seems to extend far beyond the required lyricism.’ Opernwelt

‘Meloy is astounding in her performance as Ariel, a role that’s a brilliant stroke from Adès’ pen. He has created a serious competitor for Mozart’s Queen of the Night. In this production, Ariel is an airborne theremin, a fireball of fioritura…flitting about on pulleys and wires. Needless to say, she’s a scene stealer.’ BachTrack

‘An extraordinary performance, gripping for Meloy’s freshness and nuance, as if the whole thing were unscripted.’ The Stage

‘Impressive poise and a finished soprano.’ The New York Times

‘Pleasing flexibility and admirable control.’ Opera News

‘Meloy was outstanding in Hecuba’s entreaty to Camilla Roberts’ noble Andromache.’ The Spectator

‘Meloy’s thoughtful Queen of the Night was virtuosic and not the usual pantomime caricature of evil.’ The Observer

One thought on “About

  1. Dear Laura Meloy,
    My wife and I so enjoyed your Penally Abbey performance yesterday. I took the liberty of handing you my card as it struck me that you might like to consider my monologues of the two Tenby painters Gwen John and Nina Hammett. These, together with a piece for Augustus John, had two amateur performances but the two women’s voices make a hour length text which you might find both interesting and challenging.
    I would be happy to send you these. We return to the Vale of Glamorgan next week when I can access my study and computer again.
    I do hope that you do not mind this suggestion. It comes entirely encouraged by your energy and wit in the Penally performance.
    Sincerely,
    Professor Tony Curtis

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